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However, in modern use, both words may carry a shadow of the right connotations of obsessive interest and/or social ineptitude; see the geek and nerd pages for details.Think of the older, more pejorative senses of get slung around in a similar manner.come in many flavors, but one thing can be said for each and every one of them.

The closest troper-speak cognate would be "Loony Fan." In Japan, the term doesn't carry a positive meaning at all.

One of the first things most Japanese language classes often have to teach people is that calling yourself an otaku in Japan is a bad thing.

It was about an inch and a half thick and two feet long. It was a magic wand that made people do whatever the French wanted them to do. “Let’s give the little bitch a light jolt to make her realize we mean business,” Glenda said coldly.

” Smiling, Frank took a metal rod from his coat pocket. “This, my sweet little Suzy, is something the French used when they were in Algeria. Sue was afraid she was once again going to shame herself by reacting sexually. Glenda plugged the other end of the trailing wiring into a wall socket.

“I don’t care if you threaten to tell my father about me or not.

Hank came through the door, pushing a heavy metal table mounted on wheels.

However, females seem to be either getting more common lately or becoming more relaxed about showing it.

The term itself comes from the very polite form of "you", which can come off as socially awkward.

The best guess as to how the term became associated with obsessive fandom is that the word was an inside joke among the production staff of the anime series in 1982, and that they would have characters (notably Lynn Minmay) use the over-polite form of address, even when inappropriate.

Fans picked it up and used it in conversation between each other even well past the point when they would use other forms of "you", such as "kimi" or "Anata" or "omae".

She writhed and twisted on the table, but the rod went in easily.

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